sleepydrummer:

“Believe me—the crowd gave me $18 in tips. I ran out the door. Bought a whole chicken. Ran up Seventh Avenue to my home. Mother and I ate that night— and we have been eating pretty well since.”—Billie Holiday, recounts her first paid singing gig

sleepydrummer:

“Believe me—the crowd gave me $18 in tips. I ran out the door. Bought a whole chicken. Ran up Seventh Avenue to my home. Mother and I ate that night— and we have been eating pretty well since.”

—Billie Holiday, recounts her first paid singing gig

And she forgot the stars, the moon, and sun,
And she forgot the blue above the trees,
And she forgot the dells where waters run,
And she forgot the chilly autumn breeze;  
She had no knowledge when the day was done,
And the new morn she saw not: but in peace
Hung over her sweet Basil evermore,
And moisten’d it with tears unto the core.

John Keats, Isabella (via talesofpassingtime)

sonofbaldwin:

sonofbaldwin:

Toni Morrison on “Post-racial America”

"And I will know the difference when I, you know, see these policeman start shooting white boys in the back—because they have keys in their hands that look like guns. Then when you ask me that question, I will say, ‘we got there.’ They can do something that outrageous and talk to some white parents, and say, ‘Oh! Excuse me. I thought it was a gun. And when THAT makes sense, then we’re in good shape.”

- Toni Morrison on when she will know that America has actually achieved a post-racial state

whoartgos:

today is plastered
on your face,
dripping

and tomorrow is
somewhere else,
another lifetime
away

sage advice:
don’t look back

your neck can’t take
it, we’re only built
to run a certain
number of miles

and you know

they don’t fix anything
anymore

theparisreview:

“My poetry has been called polyphonic, which is to say that I have always been full of voices speaking; in a way I consider myself an instrument, a medium. My friend Jeanne Hersch, who introduced me to the existentialism of Karl Jaspers, used to say, “I have never seen a person so instrumental,” meaning that I was visited by voices. There is nothing extraterrestrial in this, but something within myself. Am I alone in this? I don’t think so. Dostoyevsky was one of the first writers, along with Friedrich Nietzsche, to identify a crisis of modern civilization: that every one of us is visited by contradictory voices, contradictory physical urges. I have written about the difficulty of remaining the same person when such guests enter and go and take us for their instrument. But we must hope to be inspired by good spirits, not evil ones.”
—Czeslaw Milosz, The Art of Poetry No. 70

theparisreview:

“My poetry has been called polyphonic, which is to say that I have always been full of voices speaking; in a way I consider myself an instrument, a medium. My friend Jeanne Hersch, who introduced me to the existentialism of Karl Jaspers, used to say, “I have never seen a person so instrumental,” meaning that I was visited by voices. There is nothing extraterrestrial in this, but something within myself. Am I alone in this? I don’t think so. Dostoyevsky was one of the first writers, along with Friedrich Nietzsche, to identify a crisis of modern civilization: that every one of us is visited by contradictory voices, contradictory physical urges. I have written about the difficulty of remaining the same person when such guests enter and go and take us for their instrument. But we must hope to be inspired by good spirits, not evil ones.”

Czeslaw Milosz, The Art of Poetry No. 70